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Dying Easter Eggs the Natural Way

Are you gearing up for a visit from the Easter Bunny? Dying eggs with the kids for the annual hunt is a tradition many enjoy, and our clever Clo has a fun natural alternative for coloring those hard boiled treats: Mother Nature!

Nix the store bought dyes this year for homemade, plant-based colors derived from readily available fruits, vegetables, and spices you probably have in your kitchen or pantry. All it takes is a little stovetop magic, and you’ll be on your way.

Are you gearing up for a visit from the Easter Bunny? Dying eggs with the kids for the annual hunt is a tradition many enjoy, and our clever Clo has a fun natural alternative for coloring those hard boiled treats: Mother Nature!

Nix the store bought dyes this year for homemade, plant-based colors derived from readily available fruits, vegetables, and spices you probably have in your kitchen or pantry. All it takes is a little stovetop magic, and you’ll be on your way.

Before you start, here are a few tips to consider for success:

  • Hard boil the eggs and make the dyes the day before you plan to color. Place cooked eggs in the refrigerator until you are ready to go. Place dyes into mason jars, sealed with a lid, at room temperature.
  • Dying eggs can be a messy process, so consider setting up outdoors to avoid accidental spills.
  • Outfit your lil’ helpers in clothes you don’t mind being stained.
  • For food safety, be sure to return your cooked, dyed eggs to the refrigerator within two hours.

Now that you’re ready, here we go!

 

DIY Easter Egg Dye

Ingredients:

(2) dozen large eggs, hard boiled and refrigerated.

For pink/magenta colored eggs:

  • 2 cups roughly chopped, raw red beets
  • 1 tsp. distilled white vinegar 

For blue/purple colored eggs:

  • 2 cups 100% Concord grape juice (do not substitute)
  • 1 tsp. distilled white vinegar

For yellow eggs

  • 2 teaspoons ground turmeric
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 teaspoon distilled white vinegar

Directions: Put the ingredients indicated for each color in separate saucepans. Bring each to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover and simmer for 10 minutes. Set aside to let cool to room temperature. Stir in white vinegar. Pour each color into a separate 2 cup mason jar (label color), and seal with a lid. Store at room temperature until ready to use. .

To color, carefully submerge 2 eggs at a time into the desired dye jar (you may need a spoon to hold them down in the dye). *The longer the eggs steep in the dye, the deeper the color (start with 5 minutes). Use a spoon to remove the eggs from the dye, and wipe off/blot excess dye with a paper towel. Place dry dyed eggs in an egg carton, and refrigerate until the hunt.

Pro Coloring Tips:

  • For more colors, dye eggs first in one color, then wipe dry and dye in a second color.
  • To create a stripe pattern, gently wrap rubber bands around the eggs before immersing in the dye. Remove the bands after dying to see your pattern!

Have fun creating your own unique DIY Easter eggs!